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20130101
20130131
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CNNW 12
CNN 8
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 5:30pm PST
. juliet macur has been covering this for the "new york times." and daniel coyle, co-author of "the secret race: the hidden world of tour de france." juliet macur, why do you think lance armstrong is talking in this way to oprah winfrey and talking now when just a few months ago when the report came out he denounced it? >> yeah, it's pretty -- it's a pretty dramatic turn after so many years. really it's been almost 15 years of these vehement denials that he's never doped, that he's sue people that cimed he had doped and he won those lawsuits and he's threatened people who said he has doped and finally he's going to come out and say he did it only because he wants to compete again. right now he's been banned from all olympic sports for life and the only way he could get back into competition is to tell the truth and say he was doping and to help the u.s. anti-doping agency build cases against other people and in doing that he could possibly return to competition as soon as eight years. >> suarez: daniel coyle, are there a lot ofhing lance mstrong knows but hasn't said at could still get a l
CNN
Jan 19, 2013 4:00am EST
like few others do, betsy andreu whose husband rode with lance. daniel coyle, author of the book "the secret race." also bill strickland an editor-at-large at "bicycling" magazine, and senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. betsy, your thoughts, you didn't actually watch the second part of the interview, but now on the totality of what he has said, your thoughts tonight? >> yeah. i didn't. i couldn't watch the interview tonight not because i didn't want to, i taped it, i will watch it. i have been asked a lot, and for me it's a sense of relief more than vindication, but it's a tremendous sense of sadness. yesterday i was obviously visibly upset, and today it's -- as you said, it's a sense of sadness. >> sadness about what? >> it, how it has affected so many people in such a destructive way. that's why. i mean, it hurts -- obviously it has a toll on lance. so many people in the saga have been hurt. i don't know if you touched upon greg for example. his children, people who just defended him to the ninth or the tenth, whatever you say. he hurt the sport of cycling. he caused it irreparabl
CNN
Jan 15, 2013 5:00pm PST
and daniel coyle have co-written "the secret race: inside the tour de france race." i spoke with daniel coyle along with espn analyst. what i don't understand is why armstrong is doing this now. just a few months ago, he had a chance to avoid lifetime banishment. they invited him to come clean to be part of the solution. he turned them down flat. what happened between then and now? what changed? >> this is a perfect way into the way lance's brain works, very god at looking at them in a binary way. it's not about being consistent with him. it's about winning and that brain is really built for that. this point you figure the best path forward was to go to oprah. that's what he's doing. the problem that he faces is that you can win the tour de france but it's hard to win a confession. that has to do with genuine feeling. it has to do with contrition. >> juliette, you were saying the most important thing to remember is that armstrong is an athlete, that he's not in this to say sorry, clean up cycling or help charity. he wants to compete in competitions and he can't do that now. >> exactly.
CNN
Jan 15, 2013 10:00pm PST
from tyler hamilton there. he and daniel coyle have co-written "the secret race: inside the hidden world of the tour de france, doping, cover-ups, and winning at all costs." i spoke with daniel coyle along with espn analyst roger cossack and "new york times" sportswriter juliet mckerr. >> daniel, what i don't understand really is why armstrong is doing this now. because just a few months ago he had a chance to avoid lifetime banishment. the u.s.a.d.a. had invited him to come clean to be part of the solution. he turned them down flat. so what happened between then and now? what changed? >> this is a perfect lens into the way lance's brain works. he's really good at figuring out complex situations, looking at them in a very binary way and figuring out a path forward. it's not about being consistent with him. it's about winning. and that brain is really built for that. so at this point he figured the best path forward was to go to oprah. and that's what he's doing. but the problem that he faces is that you can win the tour de france but it's hard to win a confession. that has to do wi
CNN
Jan 17, 2013 7:00pm PST
is daniel coyle along with tyler hamilton of "secret race" inside the hidden world of the tour de france, doping, cover-ups and winning at all coasts. also bill strickland and senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. first blush, what do you think? >> it's the most painful, successful therapy session in television. it's riveting. >> have you ever seen armstrong so uncomfortable, so nervous? >> he looks like he's strapped to the sift plane that's crashing. he's not giving it up. occasionally there are flashes where it seems like he's genuinely self-reflecting. a lot more pauses and hair splitting, as she said. >> do you think he's telling the truth, the full truth? >> no, i don't. clearly at parts -- in our book we recorded very clearly that armstrong was the kingpin there. he made a phone call to basically end tyler hamilton's career. he had the number of the uci president in his pocket. after tyler hamilton beat him in an important race before the tour. he had hamilton hauled in and busted for doping. that type of power was what he wielded. >> armstrong seems to indicate he wasn't forcing p
CNN
Jan 18, 2013 1:00am PST
it all before weighing in on what she heard. also daniel coyle is back with us. also bill strickland, editor at large for "bicycling" magazine and senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. betsy, your impressions on what you heard tonight. >> i'm really disappointed. he owed it to me. you owed it to me, lance, and you dropped the ball. after what you've done to me, what you've done to my family and you couldn't own up to it. and now we're supposed to believe you? you have one chance at the truth. this is it. if he's not going to tell the truth, if he can't say, yes, the hospital room happened, then how are we to believe everything else he's saying? we're already questioning him. >> you were in a hospital room and you heard lance armstrong tell doctors about all the drugs that he took? >> yeah, yeah. it happened. >> and he denied it happened up and down, and this was a key part of a lawsuit that he ended up winning. >> yeah, that he settled with. but if the hospital room didn't happen, just say it didn't happen, but he won't do it because it did happen. and if this is his way of saying, i
CNN
Jan 17, 2013 8:00pm PST
by bill strickland, editor in large of "bicycling" magazine and daniel coyle, author of "the secret race" and jeff toobin. there's a lot of things that you just think he wasn't owning up to that he wasn't telling the truth. he wasn't a kingpin. this wasn't a sophisticated operation or incredibly sophisticated. the idea he was only doing what everyone else was doing, he had access to the same drugs everyone else had. these are all lies, not true. >> we thought -- we went in thinking it would be a limited admission. this is an incredibly limited admission. and almost so limited that there's no good legal reason to limit it this way. it turns into a psychological profile of where he's at. so much resistance and stubbornness. clearly a long way to go before he delivers what we can trust and think. >> why do you think he gave this interview? >> because he likes risk. he likes taking a big chance and feels he's big enough to pull it off. he's done this -- early in his career, a world championship race. he took off by himself figuring he could crush everybody. he didn't. he got caught. same thi
CNN
Jan 18, 2013 7:00pm PST
. >> panel betsy andreu, author daniel coyle, jeffrey toobin. his fortune has been estimated -- do you think it's fair to say lance armstrong would not be lance armstrong if it were not for his doping? if he had not dond, he wouldn't have that money -- i mean -- oprah -- we wouldn't be sitting here talking about him because he wouldn't have achieved the things, the fame, the endorsements all of that had he not doped. betsy? >> but that's all stolen money. i'm jumping up and down here saying are you kidding me? you lost $75 million? boo hoo hoo hoo. i am -- he's not getting it. what about greg la mans bike company. that was completely destroyed. it doesn't make sense. what about scott mercy not having a career. chr christof not having a career. other guys not doing what he wanted them to do not having a career. you can't put a price tag on opportunity lost. wrer not talking about millions of dollars. we're talking about people who want to make a living so they can pay a mortgage and save some money after. >> and all the people who were never able to accomplish or reach the heights that, you k
PBS
Jan 15, 2013 11:00pm PST
night we talk about this entire story, with daniel coyle, juliet macur, and david epstein. >> the most interesting thing is definitely it is the most dramatic and precipitous fall of an athlete really worldwide in the history of sports. people have fallen down before, but not as quickly or as really breathtakingly as lance has done over the last couple of months, i have covered sports a long time and never seen anything like it. >> this isn't about lance in a bigger way, this story i know we are focused on him but really much bigger than limb, this is about our culture and story about abung pwer and what is he going to say to them? is he going to talk in terms of this is right and wrong or is he going to say i just want to get -- >> we continue now with sally jenkins of the washington post. >> i think we have done a poor job of defining what doing is, what is therapy versus what is doping, what helps a guy simply, you know, get back on the bike to ride another day versus what gives him a genuine competitive advantage, what substances are truly performance enhancing and which are just
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 12:00am PST
is daniel coyle, the secret race, the hidden world of tour de france from washington, juliet macur, a sports reporter for "the new york times", and here in new york, david epstein, se a senior writer of sports illustrated, i am pleased to have all of them here on this program this evening. >> i just start with you, david, because you are here and go around. how big of a story is this? >> it is huge. lance has always been huge, so look at cycling, how many people really, cyclic, cycling when does it get on national headline programs, it doesn't, it did with lance armstrong and after lance armstrong it didn't and it is again because lance armstrong is in the news again. it is a massive story and i think his story had as many sort of components to it of what people look to sports for as any story that has ever been told in sports. >> rose: daniel. >> it is a greek myth, we have seen his rise and now we are compelled by his fall because it is driven by the same quality, that willingness to do anything to win in cycling that took him to some dark places and seeing exactly as we wrote in our book
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)